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Post to Post Newel Turnings


Posted: 09th January 2020 in Technical

Introduction:

There’s often confusion around newel post turnings, with regards to which type of turning to use where, as depending upon where the post is on the staircase, a different type of turning will be required.

N.B. when ordering a staircase from us with turned newel posts, we’ll sort all this out for you, sending you the correct posts.

Post to Post Newel Turnings post image

What are the different types of turnings?:

There are three types of commonly used newel post turnings, within each range of stair parts.

 

Top/Bottom Newel Turning - NT160:

Generally used at the top and bottom of a staircase and on runs on flat landings.

This is the most common turned post.

Image showing Top/Bottom Newel Turning - NT160

 

Winder Newel Turning - NT202:

Generally used where there’s a kite winder mid flight.

It’s shorter in length than a normal turned post to allow for the handrail to go into the drilled base it sits into.

Image showing Winder Newel Turning - NT202

 

Intermediate Newel Turning - NT415:

Generally used where there’s a quarter landing mid flight.

It’s double block allows handrail to run into the lower block and out the upper block.

Image showing Intermediate Newel Turning - NT415

 

Please Note:

Depending on the manufacturer sometimes these dimensions vary slightly, however the concept is the same with the three types of posts.

We stock turned posts in PineHemlockWhite Oak in a variety of styles in our shop.

Examples:

Below are some examples showing common staircase configurations and the correct type of turning in that scenario:

 

 

 

Calculating the length of the posts on the staircase.

Below is an explanation of how to set post heights on a staircase.

On The Rake:

  • 950mm from the pitch line to the top of the post.
  • The handrail should set 900mm above the pitch line where the post meets the string.
  • The top of the post should be 50mm above this.

On Landing Areas:

  • 950mm from the landing to the top of the post
  • The handrail should be set 900mm above the landing, with the top of the post 50mm above this.
  • The post at the top of the stairs should also be set from the landing to take the landing balustrade.

N.B For commercial stairs handrail should be 1100mm above the landing.

Post Heights on the diagram above:

Post A:

  • Post A is at the bottom of the staircase and is a 160 turning.
  • The height to the top of the handrail is 900mm above the pitch line.
  • The height to the top of the post is 50mm above this.
  • The height from the top of the post to the bottom of the turning is 725mm.
  • The drilled base is thus 482mm.

Post B:

  • Post B is at the top of the staircase and is a 160 turning.
  • The height to the top of the raking handrail is 900mm above the pitch line.
  • The height to the top of the post is 950mm above the landing.
  • The height from the top of the post to the bottom of the turning is 725mm
  • The drilled base length will depend upon the depth of your string and how far you wish the post to protrude down below the stairs.

Because Post B is a top post, it needs to be tall enough to take the landing handrail at 900mm above the landing, this means that it’s height is defined by the landing not the pitch line unlike  Post A.

Post C:

  • Post C is on the landing and is a 160mm turning.
  • The height to the top of the handrail is 900mm above the pitch line.
  • The height to the top of the post is 50mm above this.
  • The height from the top of the post to the bottom of the turning is 725mm
  • The drilled base length will depend upon how far you require it to protrude below the floor.

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